Home Messages Search Site Map Boaters Info
 

 

The Volcanoes of Guatemala

The 20 tallest volcanos of Guatemala (13471 bytes)
The 20 tallest volcanos in Guatemala (height in meters).

Note: There are hundreds of ancient volcanic vents and sites of past volcanic activity in Guatemala but only some 35 of these are officially recognized as "volcanoes".

Click here for an introduction to Volcanology
With streaming audio 

ACATENANGO [photo]
Elev: Two peaks at 3,975m (13,041 ft) and 3,880m (12,730 ft)
Cone: Composite
Eruption:
Status: Dormant
Location: San Miguel Dueñas y Antigua Guatemala, Depto. Sacatepéquez y Acatenango en Depto. Chimaltenango.
Notes: The taller peak is called "Pico Mayor" and the smaller peak as "Yepocapa", "Tres Hermanas" or "Tres Marias". Acatenango is the third tallest in Guatemala. Near the peak are small craters emitting sulfur. Acatenango is an almost identical twin of nearby Volcan de Fuego. The two volcanoes are connected by a saddleback called "La Horqueta".
ALZATATE [photo]
Elev: 2,045m (6,709 ft)
Cone: Composite
Eruption: unknown
Status: Extinct
Location: Municipio de San Carlos Alzatate, Depto. Jalapa.
Notes: This volcano has a rounded cap at the peak which makes it look a bit like an ice cream cone. Alzatate is long extinct and covered with thick forest. Nearby is Balneario Agua Tibia which is a lake approximately 150 meters (490 ft) in diameter situated in an ancient volcanic crater.
AMAYO [photo]
Elev: 1,544m (5,066 ft)
Cone: Shield
Eruption: Hawaiian
Status: Extinct
Location: Jutiapa, Depto. de Jutiapa.
Notes: Amayo is a shield volcano formed from low-viscosity basaltic lava. On various sides of the volcano one can find hollow lava tubes up to 30 feet long. These formations are characteristic of Hawaiian type shield volcanoes.
ATITLÁN [photo]
Elev: 3,557m (11,670 ft)
Cone: Composite
Eruption: Vulcanian
Status: Dormant
Location: Tolimán, Depto. Sololá.
Eruptive History: Eruptions have been noted since 1553, 1717-1721; 1826; 1827 large eruption of ash and lava; 1828; 1837; 03Jun1853 large ash eruption.

Notes: Atitlán is a strikingly beautiful volcano with an almost perfect cone shape and covered with forest. The crater is 250m (820 ft) in diameter and 50m (165 ft) deep. This volcano has been active in recent times but is now dormant and the crater is dotted with various fumaroles. It is associated with Lake Atitlán which is situated in a caldera volcano which exploded millions of years ago and buried the region in ash, as far as Mexico. Alongside Volcán Atitlán is its twin, Volcán Tolimán. All of these are part of a volcanic complex which includes San Pedro, Cerro de Oro and other features.

CERRO QUEMADO [photo]
Elev: 3,197m (10,489 ft)
Cone:
Eruption:
Status: Dormant
Location: Depto. Quetzaltenango
Eruptive History: 1785; 1821 smoke;
CERRO REDONDO [photo]
Elev: 1,220m (4,003 ft)
Cone:
Eruption: unknown
Status: Extinct
Location: Barberena, Depto. Santa Rosa.
CHICABAL [photo]
Elev: 2,900m (9,514 ft)
Cone:
Eruption:
Status: Extinct
Location: San Martín Sacatepéquez, Depto. Quetzaltenango.
Notes: Chicabal has a well formed cone and is heavily forested. In the center of the large crater at an elevation of 2,712m (8,898 ft), lies a lake with a diameter of 500m (1640 ft). This site is often used by the local Mayas to celebrate rituals.
CHINGO [photo]
Elev: 1,775m (5,823 ft)
Cone: Composite
Eruption: unknown
Status: Extinct
Location: Atescatempa y Jerez, Depto. Jutiapa, sirve de frontera entre Guatemala y El Salvador.
Notes: Chingo has a well formed cone and no eruptions are known during recorded history.
CRUZ QUEMADA [photo]
Elev: 1,690m (5,545 ft)
Cone:
Eruption: unknown
Status: Extinct
Location: Santa María Ixhuatán, Depto. Santa Rosa.
Notes: Nearby is laguna Ixpaco [photo] which is in a volcanic depression (phreatic crater), now filled with water. In this area you will find mudpots and fumaroles. The lake is small, almost perfectly round, and is a milky green color from sulfur. The lake and volcanoes Cruz Quemada and Tecuamburro are part of the same volcanic complex.
CULMA [photo]
Elev: 1,027m (3,369 ft)
Cone:
Eruption: unknown
Status: Extinct
Location: Jutiapa, Depto. Jutiapa
Notes: Culma is the smallest of the recognized volcanoes of Guatemala. The cone consists of basalt porphyry resulting from the extrusion of extremely viscous magma, hence there is no crater or vent.
CUXLIQUEL [photo]
Elev: 2,160m (7,087 ft)
Cone:
Eruption: unknown
Status: Extinct
Location: Totonicapán.
IPALA [photo]
Elev: 1,650m (5,413 ft)
Cone: Composite
Eruption: unknown
Status: Extinct
Location: Municipio de Ipala, Depto. Chiquimula.
Notes: The crater of Ipala contains a beautiful lake at an elevation of 1,493m (4,898 ft). On the south side of the volcano is a small vent called Cerro Monterrico with an elevation of 1,285m (4,216 ft).
IXTEPEQUE [photo]
Elev: 1,291m (4,236 ft)
Cone: Composite
Eruption: unknown
Status: Extinct
Location: Asunción Mita y Agua Blanca, Depto. Jutiapa.
Notes: Most notable about this volcano is the large quantity of obsidian found here, including red obsidian. Volcán Ixtepeque has the largest obsidian deposits in all of North and Central America.
JUMAY [photo]
Elev: 2,176m (7,139 ft)
Cone: Composite
Eruption: unknown
Status: Extinct
Location: Municipio de Jalapa, Depto. Jalapa.
Notes: Jumay is a large volcanic mountain with no identifiable crater or vent. The shape of the surrounding land is marked by the great lava flows from this volcano.
JUMAYTEPEQUE [photo]
Elev: 1815m (5,955 ft)
Cone:
Eruption: unknown
Status: Extinct
Location: Nueva Santa Rosa, Depto. Santa Rosa.
Notes: This volcano is easy to climb and from the top you have a view of laguna Ayarza. This beautiful blue lake of 14 km2 is situated in a pair of twin volcanic depressions at an elevation of 1,490m (4,888 ft). It appears that once there were twin volcanoes here which erupted with such force that they emptied their magma chambers and collapsed into the ground leaving twin circular depressions forming a figure 8.
LACONDÓN
Elev
: 2,770m (9,088 ft)
Cone:
Eruption:
Status:
Location:
LAS VÍBORAS [photo]
Elev: 1,070m (3,510 ft)
Cone: Shield
Eruption: Hawaiian
Status: Extinct
Location: Municipio de Atescatempa, Depto. Jutiapa
Notes: Volcán Las Víboras is a Hawaiian type shield volcano with characteristic long lava flows which are sometimes hollow (lava tubes). This occurs when a lava flow cools on the outside and then the still hot lava inside drains out leaving behind a hollow tube. This volcano's name (The Vipers) derives from the plentiful snakes found in this area.
MONTERRICO [photo]
Elev: 1,320m (4,331 ft)
Cone:
Eruption: unknown
Status: Extinct
Location: Agua Blanca, Depto. Jutiapa.
MOYUTA [photo]
Elev: 1,680m (5,512 ft)
Cone: Composite
Eruption: unknown
Status: Dormant
Location: Municipio de Moyuta, Depto. Jutiapa.
Notes: The Mayan name "Moyuta" means land of many mosquitos. Nearby is Guatemala's only geyser, Géiser Los Ausoles.
PACAYA [photo]
Elev: 2,550m (8,367 ft)
Cone: Composite
Eruption: Strombolian
Status: Active
Location: Between Guatemala City and  Escuintla, 14.38ºN - 90.60ºW
Eruptive History: 1565; 1651 powerful ash eruption; 1664 3-day eruption; 1668; 1690 active; 1775; 1961; 1965 start of almost continuous eruption to the present; 1968 ash & small lava bombs; Oct-Nov 1983 explosions and Strombolian eruption; 1984-86 eruption producing ash columns to 8 km in height, 1988-1990 Strombolian eruption, 1998 eruption with ash fall in Guatemala City;

Notes: Pacaya is an active volcano and its shape is constantly changing. Pacaya is part of a range of peaks: Hoja de Queso at 2,090m (6,857 ft), Cerro Chiquito at 2,420m (7,940 ft), and Cerro de Agua at 2,560m (8,399 ft) which are part of a large volcanic caldera that includes Lake Amatitlán and Laguna de Calderas. The vent which is actually in eruption (Pico Mackenney) is fed by a secondary magma duct.

PICO TOLIMÁN [photo]
Elev: South peak: 3,158m (10,361 ft), North peak: 3,134m (10,282 ft)
Cone: Composite
Eruption:
Status: Dormant
Location: San Lucas Toliman y Santiago Atitlan, south of Lake Atitlán, Depto. de Sololá.
Notes: Tolimán is one of several volcanos which grew up around the large caldera which forms Lake Atitlán. The north peak of Tolimán is the principal peak with a rocky elliptical crater 150 to 200 meters (500-650 ft) in diameter and a depth of 40m (130 ft). The rock on this volcano is pyroxene andesite with hornblende.
PICO ZUNIL [photo]
Elev: 3,542m (11,621 ft)
Cone: Composite
Eruption: unknown
Status: Extinct
Location: Between the towns of Zunil, Depto. de Quetzaltenango,  Nahualá, Depto. de Sololá, y Zunilito, Depto. de Suchitepequez.
Notes: This mountain was not recognized as a volcano until recently when geologists determined that it is indeed a volcano.
QUEZALTEPEQUE [photo]
Elev: 1,903m (6,243 ft)
Cone: Composite
Eruption: unknown
Status: Extinct
Location: Municipio de Quezaltepeque, Depto. Chiquimula
Notes: Volcán Quezaltepeque is locally known as Cerro de Chiramay and is located about 10 km (6 mi) east of Quezaltepeque. It is covered with dense forest and from the peak one can see Volcán Ipala and Volcán Suchitán.
SAN PEDRO [photo]
Elev: 3,020m (9,908 ft)
Cone: Composite
Eruption:
Status: Extinct
Location: San Pedro la Laguna, Depto. Sololá.
Notes: San Pedro has a symmetric cone with a small but deep crater. This volcano is part of the volcanic complex surrounding Lake Atitlán.
SANTA MARÍA [photo]
Elev: 3,772m (12,375 ft)
Cone: Stratovolcano (Composite)
Eruption: Plinian
Status: Active
Location: Depto. Quetzaltenango, 14.758ºN - 91.548ºW
Eruptive History: 24Oct1902 violent Plinian eruption with a large quantity of magma, part of the cone ruptured. An explosion crater on the side gave birth to Santiaguito.

Notes: Santa María is part of a volcanic system which includes Volcán Siete Orejas and Volcán Chicabal. The local Mayans call this volcano "Gagxanul" which means naked mountain. Eruptions were noted by the Spanish in the 16th century. The 1902 eruption produced lava flows which traveled up to 8.6 km (5.3 mi). The city of Quetzaltenango was buried under a half meter of ash and the ash column reached an altitude of 30km (100,000 feet).

SANTIAGUITO [photo]
Elev: Variable, approx. 2,510m (8,235 ft)
Cone:
Eruption:
Status: Active
Location: Depto. Quetzaltenango, 10 km from Aldea El Palmar
Eruptive History: Santiaguito was born during the 1902 eruption of Santa María. Has been in continuous eruption since 1922. Volcanologists rate Santiaguito among the 10 most dangerous volcanos in the world (in terms of potential damage to persons and property).

Notes: Santiaguito has an ever changing shape, consisting of a twisted mass of lava flows, ash, lava fragments, and pyroclastic flows. In the recent past, this volcano has produced pyroclastic flows which encounter the nearby rivers resulting in lahars.The nearby town of El Palmar, 10km (6 mi) away, has been destroyed twice by lahars from Santiaguito. The lava dome currently growing on Santiaguito has volcanologists worried because it could collapse, unleashing a large pyroclastic flow.

SANTO TOMÁS [photo]
Elev: 3,505m (11,499 ft)
Cone: Composite
Eruption: unknown
Status: Extinct
Location: Zunil, Depto. Quetzaltenango
Notes: Santo Tomás is an ancient volcano and for some years was thought to be an ordinary mountain. Geologists have recently confirmed that it is indeed a volcano. The hot springs which feed Balneario Fuentes Georginas are heated by the plumbing of Volcán Santo Tomás. Volcán Santo Tomás is also called "Pecul".
SIETE OREJAS [photo]
Elev: 3,370m (11,056 ft)
Cone: Composite
Eruption: unknown
Status: Extinct
Location: La Esperanza, San Martín, Depto. Quetzaltenango.     
Notes: This volcano has seven peaks, hence the name, Siete Orejas (Seven Ears).
SUCHITÁN [photo]
Elev: 2,042m (6,699 ft)
Cone: Composite
Eruption: unknown
Status: Extinct
Location: Aldea Suchitán, Muni. Santa Catarina Mita, Depto. Jutiapa.
Notes: Suchitán is the highest peak of a volcanic complex which includes a younger volcano, Cerro Mataltepeque (1,854m / 6,083 ft) and a series of cinder cones. The department of Jutiapa is criss-crossed by faults and contains 181 eruptive foci, more than any other Guatemalan department.
TACANÁ [photo]
Elev: 4,092m (13,425 ft)
Cone: Composite
Eruption:
Status: Dormant
Location: The municipality of Tacaná, Depto. San Marcos, on the border between Guatemala and México.
Eruptive History: 1855 cracks appeared emitting smoke; 1949;

Notes: Tacaná is the second highest volcano in Guatemala and has a crater 400 meters (1,300 ft) in diameter. The top of the cone is solid andesite lava and light colored hypersthene. The volcano sits atop a mass of granite called la Sierra Madre. There are active fumaroles on the skirts of the volcano.

TAHUAL [photo]
Elev: 1,716m (5,630 ft)
Cone: Composite
Eruption: unknown
Status: Extinct
Location: Municipio de El Progreso, Depto. Jutiapa and Municipio Monjas, Depto. Jalapa.
Notes: Tahual is formed from successive layers of great lava flows from the early Quaternary Period, only about 2 million years ago. A secondary vent formed on the skirts of this volcano which  became the caldera for Laguna del Hoyo, an unusual lake about 150m (500 ft) in diameter and very deep.
TAJUMULCO [photo]
Elev: 4,220m (13,845 ft)
Cone: Composite
Eruption:
Status: Extinct
Location: The municipality of Tajumulco, Depto. San Marcos, 17 km from the border with México
Notes: Tajumulco is the tallest volcano in all of Central America. Tajumulco has two peaks. The higher peak at 4,220m (13,845 ft) has a crater 50m (160 ft) in diameter. The lower peak has an elevation of 4,100m (13,451 ft). The type of rock found on both peaks is hornblende andesite and pyroxene.
TECUAMBURRO [photo]
Elev: 1,945m (6,381 ft)
Cone: Composite
Eruption:
Status: Dormant
Location: Pueblo Nuevo Viñas, Taxisco y Chiquimulilla, Depto. Santa Rosa.
Notes: Tecuamburro is a volcanic complex composed of several peaks includinng Cerro La Soledad (1,845m), Cerro Peña Blanca (1,850m), and Cerro de Miraflores (1,945m). Cerro Peña Blanca is perhaps the most interesting, with fumaroles emitting sulfur and covered by a beautiful forest. At the base of Tecuamburro is Laguna de Ixpaco, a lake 350m (1,150 ft) in diameter, formed in an explosion crater. The lake is yellow green in color and emits a strong sulfur odor. There are also sulfur hot springs nearby.
TOBÓN [photo]
Elev: 1,800m (5,906 ft)
Cone:
Eruption: unknown
Status: Extinct
Location: Aldea Potrero Carrillo, San Pedro Pinula, Depto. Jalapa.
VOLCÁN DE AGUA [photo]
Elev: 3,765m (12,352 ft)
Cone: Composite
Eruption:
Status: Extinct
Location: Deptos. Escuintla, Sacatepéquez and Guatemala
Notes: The local Cakchiquel Maya refer to Volcan de Agua as "Hunapú". Long ago, the crater was filled with water. On 10Sep1541, earthquakes from Volcan de Fuego ruptured the lip of Agua's crater causing a mudslide (lahar) that destroyed Santiago de los Caballeros (the original capital of Central America) and killed many, including Pedro de Alvarado's wife, Beatriz de la Cueva.
VOLCÁN DE FUEGO [photo]
Elev: 3,763m (12,346 ft)(variable depending on eruptions)
Cone: Composite
Eruption: Vulcanian
Status: Active
Location: Alotenango, Depto. Sacatepéquez and part of Chimaltenango.
Eruptive History: 1524 ash & scoria; 27Dec1581 ash; 14Jan1582 scoria; Jul-Dec 1585 scoria; 1614; 1623 ash; 1668 ash; 1705 ash; Aug-Dec1717 powerful earthquakes, landslides & ash eruption; 1732; 1779; 1829; 1857

Notes: The Cakchiquel Mayans call this volcano "Chi Gag". Fuego is almost an identical twin of Acatenango. Fuego is very interesting to scientists because it has been in almost constant eruption since 1524 (over 400 years) with numerous large explosive eruptions and frequent earthquakes. The last big eruption was in 1974. During a big eruption, ash from Fuego falls as far as El Salvador and Honduras.

Copyright © 1999-2008 Phillip C. Landmeier

Click here for an introduction to Volcanology

Volcano Photos Part 1 - Deptos. Chiquimula, Jalapa
Volcano Photos Part 2 - Deptos. Jutiapa, Santa Rosa
Volcano Photos Part 3 - Deptos. Sacatepequez, Sololá, Guatemala
Volcano Photos Part 4 - Deptos. Quetzaltenango, San Marcos

Updated April 20, 2008

Home Messages Search Site Map Boaters Info
 

 

Free Hit Counters
Free Counter